Define: Contributory

Contributory
Contributory
Full Definition Of Contributory

Contributory adj is a term used in legal contexts to describe a type of liability where a person is held responsible for their contribution to a harmful event or outcome. In this context, the term “contributory” refers to the act of contributing or playing a part in causing the harm. This concept is often applied in cases where multiple parties are involved in causing an injury or damage, and each party’s contribution is considered when determining liability. The legal principle of contributory holds that if a person’s actions or negligence contributed to the harm, they can be held partially or fully responsible for the resulting consequences.

Contributory FAQ'S

Contributory negligence is a legal doctrine that holds a plaintiff partially responsible for their own injuries or damages if they contributed to the accident or incident in question.

In jurisdictions that follow the contributory negligence rule, if the plaintiff is found to have contributed to their own injuries, they may be barred from recovering any compensation from the defendant.

Contributory negligence completely bars the plaintiff from recovering compensation if they are found to have contributed to their own injuries. Comparative negligence, on the other hand, allows the plaintiff to recover damages proportionate to their level of fault.

Contributory negligence is typically determined by a judge or jury based on the evidence presented during a trial. They will assess the actions of both the plaintiff and the defendant to determine the degree of fault.

Contributory negligence can be used as a defence in any case where the plaintiff’s own actions or negligence contributed to their injuries or damages. It is commonly used in personal injury cases.

Yes, contributory negligence can be used as a defence in a medical malpractice case if the plaintiff’s own actions or failure to follow medical advice contributed to their injuries or worsened their condition.

Yes, contributory negligence can be used as a defence in a product liability case if the plaintiff’s misuse or failure to follow instructions contributed to their injuries or damages.

Yes, contributory negligence can be used as a defence in a premises liability case if the plaintiff’s own actions, such as ignoring warning signs or trespassing, contributed to their injuries.

Some jurisdictions have adopted comparative negligence or modified comparative negligence rules, which allow the plaintiff to recover damages even if they are partially at fault. It is important to consult with a local attorney to understand the specific laws in your jurisdiction.

Related Phrases
No related content found.
Disclaimer

This site contains general legal information but does not constitute professional legal advice for your particular situation. Persuing this glossary does not create an attorney-client or legal adviser relationship. If you have specific questions, please consult a qualified attorney licensed in your jurisdiction.

This glossary post was last updated: 23rd April 2024.

Cite Term

To help you cite our definitions in your bibliography, here is the proper citation layout for the three major formatting styles, with all of the relevant information filled in.

  • Page URL:https://dlssolicitors.com/define/contributory-2/
  • Modern Language Association (MLA):Contributory. dlssolicitors.com. DLS Solicitors. May 23 2024 https://dlssolicitors.com/define/contributory-2/.
  • Chicago Manual of Style (CMS):Contributory. dlssolicitors.com. DLS Solicitors. https://dlssolicitors.com/define/contributory-2/ (accessed: May 23 2024).
  • American Psychological Association (APA):Contributory. dlssolicitors.com. Retrieved May 23 2024, from dlssolicitors.com website: https://dlssolicitors.com/define/contributory-2/
Avatar of DLS Solicitors
DLS Solicitors : Divorce Solicitors

Our team of professionals are based in Alderley Edge, Cheshire. We offer clear, specialist legal advice in all matters relating to Family Law, Wills, Trusts, Probate, Lasting Power of Attorney and Court of Protection.

All author posts