Define: Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organization Statute

Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organization Statute
Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organization Statute
Quick Summary of Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organization Statute

The RICO law prohibits individuals involved in criminal activities from using legitimate businesses to carry out illegal activities.

Full Definition Of Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organization Statute

The Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organization (RICO) statute is a federal law that prohibits organized criminal groups from utilizing legitimate businesses to conduct illegal activities. One instance of RICO in action occurred when the government employed it to prosecute the leaders of the Gambino crime family in New York City. These leaders were accused of employing their control over legitimate businesses, such as construction and waste management companies, to engage in illegal activities like extortion and money laundering. Another example involves the government’s use of RICO to prosecute members of a motorcycle gang who were utilizing their legitimate motorcycle repair shop as a front for drug trafficking. RICO aims to target organized criminal groups that exploit legitimate businesses for illegal purposes. The law enables the government to prosecute not only the individuals involved in the illegal activities but also the businesses they employ for such activities. These examples demonstrate how RICO has been utilised to target criminal groups that utilise legitimate businesses as a façade for their illegal operations.

Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organization Statute FAQ'S

The RICO statute is a federal law enacted in 1970 that allows the prosecution and civil litigation of individuals or organisations involved in organized crime activities.

The RICO statute covers a wide range of criminal activities, including but not limited to, bribery, extortion, money laundering, fraud, drug trafficking, and murder.

Any individual or organisation involved in a pattern of racketeering activity can be charged under the RICO statute. This includes individuals, corporations, partnerships, and even government entities.

A pattern of racketeering activity refers to engaging in at least two or more criminal acts within a ten-year period that are related to an enterprise. These acts must have a similar purpose, result, participants, or methods.

Individuals convicted under the RICO statute can face severe penalties, including imprisonment for up to 20 years, fines, asset forfeiture, and restitution to victims. Organizations can also face fines and asset forfeiture.

Yes, the RICO statute allows private individuals or entities to file civil lawsuits against those involved in racketeering activities. Successful plaintiffs can recover damages, attorney fees, and other remedies.

The statute of limitations for RICO offenses is generally five years from the last act of racketeering activity. However, certain offenses, such as murder, have no statute of limitations.

Yes, a RICO charge can be brought even if there is no conviction for the underlying criminal acts. The focus is on proving the existence of a pattern of racketeering activity and the involvement of the defendant in the enterprise.

Yes, the RICO statute can be applied to individuals involved in white-collar crimes, such as securities fraud, embezzlement, or insider trading, as long as there is a pattern of racketeering activity.

Yes, a RICO charge can be brought against a corporation or organisation without individual involvement if the entity itself is engaged in a pattern of racketeering activity. However, individual liability can also be pursued if there is evidence of personal involvement.

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This site contains general legal information but does not constitute professional legal advice for your particular situation. Persuing this glossary does not create an attorney-client or legal adviser relationship. If you have specific questions, please consult a qualified attorney licensed in your jurisdiction.

This glossary post was last updated: 6th June 2024.

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