Define: Abandon

Abandon
Abandon
Quick Summary of Abandon

To intentionally surrender one’s claim to, right to, or interest in; give up entirely. Used in situations where a tenant has left property in a residence and does not intend to return. The landlord can take over the abandoned residence but must store the property, providing notice to the tenant before selling the possessions that were left behind. Also can be used when support has not been provided to children for a year or more.

What is the dictionary definition of Abandon?
Dictionary Definition of Abandon

Abandon (verb): to completely give up, relinquish, or desert something or someone, often without any intention of returning or resuming the previous state or relationship. It involves the act of forsaking or neglecting, leaving behind or discarding, and can refer to physical, emotional, or intellectual abandonment. It implies a lack of responsibility, commitment, or care towards the abandoned entity or individual.

Cease to support or look after (someone); desert.

  1. transitive, obsolete To subdue; to take control of.
  2. transitive To give up control of, to surrender or to give oneself over, or to yield to one’s emotions.
  3. transitive To desist in doing, practising, following, holding, or adhering to; to turn away from; to permit to lapse; to renounce; to discontinue.
Full Definition Of Abandon

Abandonment refers to the act of voluntarily giving up or relinquishing one’s rights, interests, or responsibilities over a property, person, or legal obligation. In legal terms, abandonment can have various implications depending on the context in which it occurs.

In property law, abandonment typically occurs when a property owner intentionally and permanently gives up possession and control over their property without any intention of returning or reclaiming it. This can result in the loss of ownership rights and may allow others to claim ownership or possession of the abandoned property.

In family law, abandonment can refer to a situation where a parent or guardian fails to provide necessary care, support, or contact with their child for an extended period of time, leading to a presumption of abandonment. This can have significant legal consequences, such as the termination of parental rights or the awarding of custody to the other parent or a third party.

In contract law, abandonment can occur when one party fails to fulfil their obligations under a contract without any valid reason or justification. This can give rise to legal remedies for the non-breaching party, such as the right to terminate the contract, seek damages, or pursue specific performance.

Overall, abandonment is a legal concept that signifies the intentional and permanent relinquishment of rights, interests, or responsibilities, and its implications can vary depending on the specific area of law in which it is applied.

  1. To choose not to exercise or sell an option. Abandonment occurs when the option is out of the money on the expiration date.
  2. To voluntarily relinquish the rights of property ownership, usually real estate.

To intentionally and permanently give up, surrender, leave, desert or relinquish all interest or ownership in property, a home or other premises, a right of way, and even a spouse, family, or children. The word is often used in situations to determine whether a tenant has left his/her apartment and the property inside and does not intend to come back. Thus, a landlord can take over an apparently abandoned residence, but must store anything a tenant leaves behind and give notice to the tenant before selling the possessions which are left. To abandon children can mean to have no contact and give no support for a year or more.

Abandon FAQ'S

To intentionally surrender one’s claim to, right to, or interest in; give up entirely. Used in situations where a tenant has left property in a residence and does not intend to return. The landlord can take over the abandoned residence but must store the property, providing notice to the tenant before selling the possessions that were left behind. Also can be used when support has not been provided to children for a year or more.

Related Phrases
Abandon
Disclaimer

This site contains general legal information but does not constitute professional legal advice for your particular situation. Persuing this glossary does not create an attorney-client or legal adviser relationship. If you have specific questions, please consult a qualified attorney licensed in your jurisdiction.

This glossary post was last updated: 29th March 2024.

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