Define: Temporary Protected Status

Temporary Protected Status
Temporary Protected Status
Quick Summary of Temporary Protected Status

Temporary Protected Status (TPS) is a unique authorization granted to individuals from specific countries who are currently residing in the United States. This authorization permits them to remain in the country for a limited period, work, and travel without the risk of being deported to their home country. TPS is granted when an individual’s home country is deemed unsafe to return to due to factors such as war or natural disasters. It is important to note that TPS does not provide individuals with a green card, but they may be eligible to obtain one in the future if they meet the necessary requirements. Currently, there are 13 countries that qualify for TPS.

Full Definition Of Temporary Protected Status

Temporary Protected Status (TPS) is a temporary immigration status provided to individuals from specific countries who are currently residing in the United States. This status permits them to remain in the country for a specified period, during which they have the ability to work and travel. They are protected from deportation or detention by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) during this time. TPS does not result in permanent residency (a green card), but individuals with TPS may be eligible to apply for permanent residency under a different law. The Secretary of Homeland Security can grant TPS to individuals from a foreign country if it is unsafe for them to return home or if their country is unable to handle their return, such as in the case of ongoing war or environmental disasters. As of April 2022, the following countries have TPS designations or extensions: Burma (Myanmar), El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, Nepal, Nicaragua, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan, Syria, Ukraine, Venezuela, and Yemen. For instance, following the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the United States granted TPS to Haitians already in the country, allowing them to stay and work until it was safe to return home. Similarly, due to the ongoing civil war, Syrians in the United States were granted TPS, enabling them to stay and work until it is safe to return home.

Temporary Protected Status FAQ'S

TPS is a temporary immigration status granted to eligible nationals of designated countries who are unable to return to their home country due to ongoing armed conflict, environmental disaster, or other extraordinary and temporary conditions.

You may be eligible for TPS if you are a national of a designated country, have been continuously physically present in the United States since the designated date, and meet other specific eligibility requirements.

TPS status is granted for a specific period of time, which can vary depending on the designated country and the conditions that led to the TPS designation. It can be extended or terminated by the U.S. government.

Yes, TPS beneficiaries are eligible to apply for work authorization and can legally work in the United States during the period of their TPS status.

TPS beneficiaries are generally not allowed to travel outside the United States while they have TPS status, unless they receive advance parole from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

Yes, individuals in removal proceedings may be eligible to apply for TPS if they meet the eligibility requirements and are granted TPS by USCIS.

TPS may be granted to individuals who are otherwise inadmissible to the United States, but they must still meet all other eligibility requirements for TPS.

TPS eligibility may be affected by certain criminal convictions, so it is important to consult with an immigration attorney to determine if you are eligible for TPS.

TPS is available to individuals who are in the United States on another visa, as long as they meet the eligibility requirements for TPS.

TPS may be available to individuals who entered the United States illegally, as long as they meet all other eligibility requirements for TPS.

Related Phrases
No related content found.
Disclaimer

This site contains general legal information but does not constitute professional legal advice for your particular situation. Persuing this glossary does not create an attorney-client or legal adviser relationship. If you have specific questions, please consult a qualified attorney licensed in your jurisdiction.

This glossary post was last updated: 30th April 2024.

Cite Term

To help you cite our definitions in your bibliography, here is the proper citation layout for the three major formatting styles, with all of the relevant information filled in.

  • Page URL:https://dlssolicitors.com/define/temporary-protected-status/
  • Modern Language Association (MLA):Temporary Protected Status. dlssolicitors.com. DLS Solicitors. May 24 2024 https://dlssolicitors.com/define/temporary-protected-status/.
  • Chicago Manual of Style (CMS):Temporary Protected Status. dlssolicitors.com. DLS Solicitors. https://dlssolicitors.com/define/temporary-protected-status/ (accessed: May 24 2024).
  • American Psychological Association (APA):Temporary Protected Status. dlssolicitors.com. Retrieved May 24 2024, from dlssolicitors.com website: https://dlssolicitors.com/define/temporary-protected-status/
Avatar of DLS Solicitors
DLS Solicitors : Divorce Solicitors

Our team of professionals are based in Alderley Edge, Cheshire. We offer clear, specialist legal advice in all matters relating to Family Law, Wills, Trusts, Probate, Lasting Power of Attorney and Court of Protection.

All author posts