Define: Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit

Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit
Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit
Quick Summary of Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit

When the moment arrives for payment, regardless of whether it is the appropriate time to demand it, this Latin expression is used. It is frequently employed to refer to an outstanding debt that is owed but not yet due. Another Latin phrase, debitum in diem, refers to a debt that is due at a later date.

Full Definition Of Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit

When the time for payment has not yet arrived, but the money is already due. For example, John owes $100 to his friend, but the payment is not due until next month. Despite the payment deadline not being reached, the debt is still considered due. This is known as “ubi dies cessit, licet nondum venerit.” Another example is when Sarah borrowed $500 from the bank and agreed to repay it in six months. This is referred to as “debitum in diem,” as the debt is payable at a future date. These phrases are commonly used in legal and financial contexts to describe debts that are due but not yet payable, or debts that are payable in the future. They highlight the importance of keeping track of payment deadlines and understanding the terms of loans or debts.

Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit FAQ'S

“Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit” is a Latin phrase that translates to “Where the day has ended, it is not yet allowed to arrive.” It is often used in legal contexts to refer to the principle that a legal right or obligation does not arise until a specified event or condition has occurred.

In contract law, “Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit” can be used to determine when certain obligations or rights under a contract come into effect. It signifies that until the specified event or condition has occurred, the parties are not yet bound by the terms of the contract.

Yes, if the specified event or condition necessary for the contract to be enforceable has not yet occurred, a party can argue that “Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit” applies and they should not be held liable for breaching the contract.

The application of “Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit” in a contract depends on the specific language and provisions of the contract. It is essential to carefully review the contract terms to identify the triggering event or condition that must occur before the contract becomes enforceable.

While “Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit” is a Latin phrase commonly used in legal contexts, its application and recognition may vary across different jurisdictions. It is important to consult local laws and legal experts to determine its validity and relevance in a specific jurisdiction.

“Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit” is primarily used in contract law to determine the enforceability of contractual obligations. Its application in criminal law cases is limited, as criminal offenses are generally governed by different legal principles and standards.

Exceptions to the application of “Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit” may exist depending on the specific contract and jurisdiction. For example, certain contracts may include provisions that make the obligations enforceable even before the specified event or condition has occurred.

Yes, parties to a contract can agree to waive or modify the application of “Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit” through explicit provisions or mutual agreement. It is important to clearly document any modifications or waivers to ensure enforceability.

“Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit” is closely related to the concept of condition precedent in contract law. Both refer to the idea that certain events or conditions must occur before contractual obligations become enforceable.

While “Ubi Dies Cessit, Licet Nondum Venerit” is primarily used in contract law, its underlying principle of conditional enforceability can be relevant in other areas of law as well. However, its specific application may vary depending on the legal context.

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This site contains general legal information but does not constitute professional legal advice for your particular situation. Persuing this glossary does not create an attorney-client or legal adviser relationship. If you have specific questions, please consult a qualified attorney licensed in your jurisdiction.

This glossary post was last updated: 17th April 2024.

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